Jan 112016
 

Happy new year! I hope everyone had a safe and relaxing holiday season. And welcome back! Thanks, as always, for sticking around while I took care of other business. Let’s get started.

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Vocal cords -- the source of our voice and pitch

Vocal cords — the source of our voice and pitch

This week’s article comes out of Sweden, and asks the question “When we measure voices in the lab, how quickly and how well does testosterone change the voice of trans men?” Testosterone’s effects on voice have been the subject of blessings and curses (by trans men and trans women, respectively) but have received little attention by researchers.

This study was relatively simple — invite 50 trans men to participate, ask them to read into a machine every 3 months as they start testosterone, survey them, and look at their testosterone blood levels.

The men in this study varied in age, from 18 year old men just swapping from puberty blockers to testosterone to 64 year old men. All had never taken testosterone before. Testosterone forms included both intramuscular injection and transdermal (patches/gels/creams). By 3 months into treatment all the men had male testosterone levels in their blood.

So now that we know a bit about who participated…what happened in this study?

Every three months the men came into the lab and were recorded reading. The pitch and force of their voice was analyzed. Most of the study’s details of how they analyzed it is beyond me (I don’t have a foundation in voice analysis), but the results are clear. By 12 months on testosterone their voices had stopped changing. The most change happened in the first 6 months. On average their voices went from a fundamental frequency of 192 Hertz (Hz) at the beginning to 155 Hz after 3 months and finally ended up at 125 Hz. If you want to hear what those sound like, plug those numbers into this website. There was a lot of variation where their voices started out at, and a lot of variation what their voices changed to. Six of the men stayed around 143-170 Hz. Ten men started out lower than 175 Hz.

Fundamental frequency is a fancy term for pitch. On average cis men range from 85 to 155 Hz, and cis women range from 165 to 255 Hz, for reference. The type of testosterone didn’t seem to have a big effect on when voices changed or what they changed to.

What about how the men felt about their voices and whether or not the change was heard by others? The lower the pitch, the more satisfied the men felt about their voice and the more likely they were to report that they were correctly gendered on the phone. By the end of 12 months satisfaction with their voice was higher, with the most change happening between 3 and 6 months.

But it wasn’t all positive for every participant. Twelve men of the 50 also sought voice therapy. Reasons varied from vocal fatigue to the voice not being low enough to instability, strain, or hoarseness. They attended an average of 3 vocal therapy sessions. How well those sessions helped wasn’t measured.

So what’s the important stuff to take away from this study?

  • After 12 months most trans men’s voices have dropped into the male range, but individual results vary.
  • The most significant change in voice happens in the first 6 months of testosterone treatment, but changes continue to 12 months.
  • Some trans men may desire voice therapy during that first year

It’s also worth noting that this was the first published longitudinal study of trans male voices and how they change on testosterone.

What do you think? Do the study results reflect your own experiences or the experiences of your friends and loved ones? Did the researchers miss anything big? Let me know in the comments!

Want to read the study for yourself? The abstract is publicly available.