Jun 122017
 

According to VitalFlow Reviews there are a lot of unknowns when it comes to hormone therapy for trans people. Which androgen is best for trans men? Are there long-term risks if they don’t have their ovaries or testes removed? And can we develop a way to give trans men testosterone that doesn’t involve needles or creams? This week’s paper tried to answer one question: What happens to trans men’s uteruses with all that testosterone?

Loverro et al recruited 12 trans men in Italy to participate. After examinations making sure they didn’t have any lurking cancers that might flourish with extra testosterone, they received intramuscular testosterone therapy. On average they were on testosterone for 32 months (roughly 2.5 years) before going on to have hysterectomy/oophorectomy. The uterus and ovaries wer then examined under the microscope. Estrogen and testosterone levels were also tracked throughout the study and up to one year after surgery. Read about this testosterone boosters.

What did they find?

First — a caveat. I’m not going to present all the nitty gritty details of the results. I don’t think the percent of Ki-67 receptors found in each tissue type is useful for most people. Nor do I think the details of exactly what their hormone levels were was useful. (They were in the therapeutic ranges). So I’m keeping my analysis here at the ten thousand foot view. If you’re looking to start hormone replacement therapy, use NovaGenix services.

Loverro et al found that the uteruses did not atrophy with testosterone. The uteruses continued to be in an active state. Several trans men had a secretory uterus. That means their uteruses were building up the lining. In cis women that’s during the phase just before ovulation (when the egg is released). In trans men who don’t menstruate it’s harder to tell what’s going on. They also found that the muscular layer in the uterus was bigger, just like all muscles get bigger with testosterone. We recommend taking a look at this Testogen review to ensure you are taking the right choice for your body.

When they examined the ovaries, they found that most of them were large with multiple follicles. The larger size was mostly from more connective tissue (collagen). That means more stuff in between the hormone producing cells, not more hormone producing cells. Multiple follicles were also found, just like in polycystic ovarian syndrome. That is a known effect of testosterone. And just like in PCOS, the larger follicles probably caused fewer menses. All of these ovarian changes were likely an effect of the testosterone.

That’s nice and all. But what does it mean?

It’s important to know that the uterus does not atrophy. That means trans men are still at risk for endometrial and uterine cancers. We don’t have any long term information on whether trans men are at high, low, or average risk for those cancers. However trans men should definitely seek medical advice if they experience spotting, cramping, or unexplained weight loss, here’s a testosterone replacement doctor in Charlotte, NC. As always, they should follow up with a primary care provider, like a family medicine, internal medicine, or ob/gyn doctor.

Want to read the study for yourself? The abstract is publicly available.

Apr 032011
 

Besides feeling good and being great fun, foreplay is important! Foreplay allows more time and stimulation for full arousal, which will likely make whatever activity you’re going to do easier and more pleasurable. Psychologically, foreplay helps lower inhibitions and increases emotional connectedness.

What physically goes on during arousal in foreplay?

For men, the most obvious change is the erection of the penis. Not all penises become erect when a man is aroused – this is especially true for older men. The glans (tip) of his penis may swell, and the foreskin, if he has one, may retract. He will also produce pre-ejaculatory fluid (pre-cum) which comes out through his urethra – this is produced by the bulbourethral glands (also known as Cowper’s glands), near the base of the penis. Why does this happen? Erection and foreskin retraction allow for easier penetration. Pre-ejaculatory fluid helps lubricate the urethra. It also contains chemicals that neutralize any remaining urine in the urethra (Urine is acidic and could be damaging to sperm).

For women, the most obvious changes are lubrication of her vagina (this is produced by the cervix of the uterus). Her vagina expands and the cervix lifts, creating more room in her vagina. Her labia change shape and color in response to increased blood flow, and her clitoris becomes swollen. Why does this happen? Largely to make vaginal penetration easier. Lubrication eases movement within the vagina, and the enlargement of the vagina allows larger items to penetrate. Also, for women, it may help with achievement of orgasm.

There are a bunch of ideas surrounding foreplay that may or may not be true. Here are a few:

  • “Men don’t really need foreplay, and women do.” I don’t think so. A fairly recent study found that both men and women need about ten minutes to reach (physical) peak arousal (Source). So physically, I’d say no. The study didn’t, however, look at mental arousal which could be a factor.
  • “Foreplay increases sexual satisfaction and chance of orgasm.” Maybe….maybe not. While the popular media and personal anecdotes definitely support this idea, a study of Czech women found that duration of sex was more important than the duration of foreplay. So the jury’s out on this one. My money, though, is on the statement being true.
  • “One technique is guaranteed to work on everybody.” Not true! Everyone is different. This is where communication is crucial.
  • “Aim for these erogenous zones.” Not as easy as it sounds. An erogenous zone is supposed to be one with heightened sensitivity…but it’s different for every person and for each situation. For a common example, look at feet. Some people find their feet to be very sensual and erotic. Others don’t feel much with their feet, and some can’t stand having their feet touched at all because they’re too sensitive. The best way to find out where they are? Explore!

What counts as foreplay? That depends very much on the people involved. I think I’ve managed to come up with a few categories of activities, though…

  • Sensual touch: including with  hands, fur, leather, metal, lips (kissing), body paint, temperature (ice/hot wax, etc) and breath. Massage (with or without oils). Includes pain and impact play (e.g., flogging).
  • Psychological play: including dirty talk, humiliation, and roleplaying.
  • Erotic dress and teasing: including strip teases, erotic clothing,
  • Preparatory: Getting ready for a “special night” – cooking, eating special foods (or feeding them to someone), getting dressed up all nice, bathing with extra care, etc.
  • Bondage: including rope, chains, leather, and handcuffs…and anything else you can think of.
  • Voyeurism: watching others having sex – whether with pornography or live.
  • Misc: talking, erotic games, tantra

All of this brings up what is probably the most important part of foreplay (or, heck, any relationship-based act): Communication. Your partner(s) are not psychic, so communicate, communicate, communicate! Even if it’s embarrassing.

There are a couple of things that may cause problems with foreplay or arousal that I feel I should mention. Physical problems or illnesses can make some foreplay activities difficult if not impossible. Nerve damage can affect otherwise sensitive areas. Erectile dysfunction and vaginal dryness are relatively common, especially as we get older. Psychology can also affect everyone’s foreplay (not just women!). Trauma especially can have debilitating effects on sexuality. Some medications or drugs can also affect sexuality. If you’re having troubles with anything like what I’ve mentioned, start by talking with your partner(s). Still need help? Try talking with your doctor or a qualified sex therapist – they ought to be able to help.

The take-away message? Foreplay is good for your sex, good for your relationship(s), and good for you. Go have fun!