Jun 222015
 
Fruit made of marzipan

Fruit made of marzipan

If you find yourself feeling confused by the many and contradictory messages about food and diet and supplements, you’re not alone. It’s a maze!

Believe it or not, medical students do get training in nutrition. Here are some general guidelines to help you figure out the weird and wacky world of food and supplements today!

1. Eat as broad a variety as you can. Include as many vegetables and fruit as you can. It doesn’t need to be fresh vegetables. They can be frozen or canned, or even processed. But the variety helps you get vitamins and minerals, and is tasty too.

2. Don’t bother with organic. There’s no nutritional difference or health benefit. You’re better off saving the money and using it to buy more vegetables.

3. Be reasonable with salt and fat. Don’t go on a very low salt/fat or very high salt/fat diet. Your body needs both, but too much of either may increase your risk of heart disease.

4. Unless you’ve been told otherwise by your doctor, don’t take multivitamins, vitamins, or supplements. Not even antioxidants! They don’t do healthy people much if any good, and may cause harm. Exceptions to this rule include calcium for women who don’t get enough calcium in their diet and iron/folic supplements for pregnant women to prevent anemia and birth defects.

5. Eat less and move more. You don’t need to run a marathon unless you want to. But moderate exercise is definitely good. So is being a “normal” (not overweight, obese, or underweight) weight.

6. Try eating less meat. Eating lots of meat is associated with cardiac disease. Try eating a little less and getting your protein from lentils, beans, tofu, nuts, dairy, or plain ol’ whole wheat. Besides, meat is expensive.

7. Ignore fads. Yes, this includes low-carb, high-carb, low-fat, high-fat, no-gluten, many food intolerances…and the list goes on!

8. Tell your doctor about your nutrition and if you take any supplements, including herbs. Some foods may interact with your medications (grapefruit is notorious for this). If you’re trying to change a habit for the better, consider mentioning it to them. They may know some resources that would help.

Got any more? Let me know your thoughts in the comments!!

Sep 052013
 
CC BY-NC 2.0 flickr user greenplasticamy

Some doctors are pretty cool.

This post is a legacy page, and was part of an on-going series, Trans 101 for Trans People. It covers questions about medical transition, hormones, surgeries, or seeking health care for transgender people.

For the material that once lived on this page, please see this page.

Please update your links to the full Trans 101.

May 192013
 

I got back from the 2013 National Transgender Health Summit (NTHS) in Oakland last night. What a fabulous conference! I’m still processing a lot of my notes, but wanted to give a quick report on it before I flood the blog with new resources.

First some basic information. NTHS is cosponsored by UCSF’s Center of Excellence for Transgender Health and the World Professional Association for Transgender Health. It’s designed for medical professionals, mental health professionals, advocates, health administrators, students, and others. I can’t speak for previous years, but this year it was a two-day event. Sessions were broken into various tracks: research, medical, mental health, policy, and special topics. And boy, did we cover quite a lot! And, as always, I wanted to be in five different places all at once.

Aside from the official session topics, though, there were some themes that stood out to me…

  • There’s a very strong need for cross-cultural trans care. Trans care, like lots of medicine, has been focused on white people. I admit to being guilty of this too! I don’t know how being trans is handled in, for example, an urban latino/a community, and I don’t know how I can best respond to those needs as a future health care provider. I met some folks who were involved in the Trans People of Color Coalition, and I hope to not only educate myself but bring more awareness to my posts here.
  • There’s a disconnect in some areas between cultural knowledge about medical treatments in trans communities and medical knowledge. I want to give a shout out to Trystan Cotten, author of Hung Jury, for bringing attention to this within trans male communities. One of his examples? Something new for me, certainly: there are anecdotal reports that some trans men can have penetrative sex after metoidioplasty. Sounds like there needs to be a community-level conversation.
  • It sounds so far like the ICD-11 system will handle both the transgender/transsexual diagnoses and the paraphilia diagnoses much better than the previous ICDs and certainly better than the DSM system. More details when the preliminary criteria are out for comment.
  • Insurance coverages for trans-related care may improve with the Affordable Care Act. Again, more on this as information becomes more available.
  • There is a lot of research going on! Yay! I’ll try to link to some of the studies I heard about in a follow up.

Plus so much more! It was really exciting. I hope to post again with more information, links to lots of new resources and shout outs for on-going studies and organizations.

Aug 152011
 

Felching is the act of sucking semen out of an anus or vagina. It can be accompanied by “snowballing”, where the semen is shared between people orally. Felching can be done by both straight and gay partners. Felching is also relatively common in the gay male barebacking community. A recent study found roughly one in sex men who bareback also do felching.

There is relatively little information about felching in the academic literature. The greatest risk with felching or snowballing is the potential to spread STDs, including HIV and hepatitis. These diseases are spread most often from the inserting partner to the receptive partner. There is also a risk of spreading intestinal parasites, if the receptive partner has one. For that reason, it’s considered a “high risk sexual behavior”.

There is no way to use barriers to reduce risk with felching. The best way to protect oneself is to get all potential sexual partners STD tested before felching. Keep in mind that HIV can take up to three months to show up on an HIV test, so you may wish to wait until a test at three months is clean.

Resources:

Mar 252011
 

There is a report that a man was sentenced to two years in prison for breaking a restraining order. He was found naked in someone else’s farm, covered in cow manure, masturbating. This is apparently the third time he’s been caught trespassing. I read this article and thought, “Hmmm this is a good opportunity to talk about scat play!”.

Unlike urine, feces is not sterile at all. The colon (aka: the large intestine) is filled with lots of bacteria – mostly good ones. The feces that passes through the colon is, naturally, full of bacteria. These bacteria, while they may do good in the colon, are definitely not good to have elsewhere in the body. They can cause infection, like vaginal or urinary tract infections. If you have parasites or a virus, you’ll find them in feces too.

So how can a person play with feces safely? By:

  • using barriers like condoms, dental dams, and gloves to avoid contact with the feces. This is especially important for mucous membranes that are part of the vagina, penis, mouth, nose, and eyes. Skin, even when it looks healthy, can have microscopic cuts and tears. Barriers are safer than bare intact skin, which is safer than skin with cuts or tears. Breaks in the skin provide a way for ickies to get in!
  • only doing fecal play when physically well and the source of the feces is healthy and well, and especially avoiding times when having diarrhea.
  • not ingesting feces because of the possibility of disease.
  • not doing fecal play while pregnant or immunocompromised.

Non-human feces can carry different and harmful diseases. For example, cats can carry Toxoplasma gondii. It’s the bug that causes toxoplasmosis, which can be deadly in people with compromised immune systems.

Fecal play needs to be discussed with your physician. In case of illness, that physician needs to know what exposures you’ve had in order to make the best diagnosis. If your physician doesn’t know that you are exposed to feces, then s/he may miss something vital and misdiagnose you! (assuming you are sick)

Other resources:

Basic information

From Go Ask Alice!

Common parasites