Mar 162015
 

170px-Rod_of_Asclepius2.svgBeing a gender or sexual minority (GSM) is not only difficulty and tricky for patients — it can also be a challenge for medical providers. Medicine can be a particularly conservative field, depending on location and specialty. Lives are, after all, often at stake.

Despite recent advances it appears that some 40% of lesbian, gay and bisexual medical students are hiding their sexual minority status in medical school. Among transgender medical students, 70% were hiding their identity. All because of fear of discrimination.

That fear has been, and still is, warranted. From medical providers transitioning and losing their practices, to medical students losing their residency slots, to LGBT health student organizations fighting to exist, LGBT providers face similar discrimination as our patients.  Similar happens for other gender and sexual minority health care providers, though we lack statistics. At a meeting of kink-identified mental health care providers, one attendee noted a high level of vulnerability for the clinicians. Being “outed” could lose them their jobs or even trigger legal action.

To some extent, discretion among health care providers is warranted. Most people don’t want to know about their clinician’s (or coworker’s) personal lives. And most GSM providers don’t actually want to share those most intimate details. It’s where the line is that can be distressing — how much information is too much? Can I discuss my wife when other women clinicians are discussing their husbands? How exactly do you notify your fellow clinicians or patients about a change in gender pronouns or name? How can a clinician use information gained from intimate encounters to help patients, without revealing too much? It’s a balance we constantly seek. Sometimes mentors are there and can help. Other times we figure it out as we go along.

Yet we bring a lot to the table, as minorities. Like many racial and ethnic minorities, there are pressures and issues that affect GSM people more than the majorities. We bring that knowledge with us to the research we choose to perform, the communities we participate in, and each and every patient encounter.

We as clinicians and future clinicians need to have the support in order to be appropriately open about our gender and sexual minority status. Our patients and clients must know they can be safe and honest with us so they can receive the most complete and respectful care possible.

Some progress has been made already. There’s an association for LGBT medical professionals. There’s an association for kink psychological research. There’s an association for transgender health. All of which allow student members and provide mentoring. Many other organizations exist too. Some US medical schools are working with their students to provide a safe and welcoming environment where these issues can be explored. The American Association of Medical Colleges recently launched a program to enhance education surrounding LGBT and intersex health care. The American Medical Association also has an LGBT Advisory committee.

I’m proud to say that my medical school has been accepting and supportive of its gender and sexual minority patients, and that clinics in the area of my medical school are seeking to expand their care to be more inclusive of LGBT patients. Support exists for both those seeking medical care, and those seeking to provide that care. It’s only the beginning.

Aug 302014
 
Image of needle and syringe - click through to see source

Needles and syringes no longer look like this. Isn’t that wonderful?

Testosterone therapy for transgender men, and others who desire testosterone supplementation, typically involves intramuscular injections of testosterone. Intramuscular injections deliver the medication deep within a large muscle — typically a thigh muscle. From there the hormone can slowly work its way into the bloodstream to do its magic. Few other options exist, and those that do are either expensive or less effective (e.g., creams). Testosterone should not be taken as a pill because it’s very bad for the liver in that form. One possible alternative that has been discussed recently is subcutaneous testosterone injections.

Subcutaneous injections go just under the skin. Most people don’t get subcutaenous injections. The most common subcutaneous injection may be insulin injections for people with diabetes. Subcutaneous injections are also how fluids are given to cats in veterinary care.

Subcutaneous testosterone has been in sporadic recent use for trans men without any research showing how well it works. But that’s changed now with the publication of the article I’m going to summarize. 🙂 So let’s hop into it!

This was a study involving 36 male-identified trans youth from ages 13-24 (minors had parental consent). None had been exposed to hormones before. Hormone levels and other lab values were measured at the beginning and after six months.

For those interested in the specific technicalities of how the hormone was given, keep reading this paragraph. For those not, skip down to the next one! They were given testosterone cypionate suspended in sesame oil that was made at a local compounding pharmacy. The young men were given the injections by the clinical staff at first, but slowly taught to self-inject. Dosing was biweekly and started at 25mg per week, slowly increasing after that for some with a final dose ranging from 25-75mg.

So what did they find? How did it go? Positively!

About 92% of the young men in this study had testosterone levels in the “male” range at the 6 month check up. Similar goes for estrogen levels — by that 6 month check up their estradiol levels were down in the “male” range too. 85% of the young men who had been menstruating had stopped by that 6 month check up. Most periods stopped roughly around the 3 month mark. Other factors, like hemoglobin (red blood cell concentration) and cholesterol shifted but were not of clinical significance.

Two of the young men had allergic reactions to the sesame oil and were switched to cottonseed oil. This is a pretty well known reaction that happens in intramuscular injections too. Some also noticed small bumps around where they injected for a few days after injection. Those were the only reported side effects. Nobody reported unhappiness with their testosterone treatment method or asked to be switched to a different method.

All in all, a well put together study. Subcutaneous injection of testosterone so far appears to be a possible alternative to intramuscular injection. But it’s worth noting that commercial testosterone is intended for intramuscular injection and that type is not what was tested here. It may not be safe or effective to inject an intramuscular formulation as a subcutaneous one — ask your physician before changing how you use your medications!

As always: this is just one study. More need to be done to confirm these results. Regardless, I think these are good first results and look forward to seeing more.

Study was published in LGBT Health. Abstract is publicly available.

Disclaimer: I have personally met Dr. Olson (lead author of this study), worked with her in a small capacity, and have attended her talks at conferences. My interactions and impressions of her may have biased my interpretation on this study. However, I do my best to keep those preconceptions from affecting my judgment.

Jun 032014
 

6763959_10420a4b6a_mThe biggest news for May of 2014 is really that Medicare lifted the blanket ban on covering genital surgeries for trans people. The National Center for Transgender Equality has a good summary (PDF) of what the decision actually means. If you’re trans and interested in surgery and are a Medicare recipient, I recommend calling the physician who’s prescribing your hormones and consulting with them about next steps. The news was covered in multiple outlets including the NY Times and CNN.

The other piece of news I spotted that is not getting as much traction as I’d like is this: Urine is NOT sterile! For a long time it’s been believed that urine produced by healthy people is sterile – at least until it passes through the urethra. Turns out not to be the case. Something to keep in mind if you have contact with urine. Source

Interested in the other news? Read on!

  • Work continues on the possibility of three-parent babies. While much of the research and reporting talks about preventing mitochondrial diseases, I still think it opens a wonderful door for three-parent poly households. The latest news is fairly political, but supportive.
  • Another study out of Europe indicates that transgender hormone therapy is safe. This was a 1-year study of both men and women, just over 100 people total No deaths or serious adverse reactions were reported. Highly recommend you skim the abstract for yourself! For US readers, please do note though that the hormones used in the study were different formulations than those used in the US. Source.
  • A published case study reminds us that not all “odd” physical things during medical transition are related to transition. This was a case of a trans man who had undiagnosed acromegaly from a benign brain tumor. Eek! He was correctly diagnosed and treated, thankfully. Source.
  • A Swedish review of transgender-related records found a transition regret rate of 2.2%. Other prevalence data, including the usual male:female ratios, are included. Source.
  • A study of gay men found that they have worse outcomes from prostate cancer treatments than straight men. Source.
Aug 152013
 

Rope (often used in BDSM ) smiley face - CC BY 3.0 Rose Lovell

A new psychological study of BDSM practitioners has just been published. This is the first such research to specifically examine the “Big Five” personality characteristics.

For those of you not interested in the nitty-gritty, here’s the digest: As a group, people who practice BDSM report a better sense of well-being and are more open to new experiences, extraverted, conscientious, and less sensitive to rejection than people who don’t practice BDSM. As with all correlations, this does not mean that BDSM activities caused these differences. Rather, people with these characteristics may be more likely to investigate BDSM.

Are you interested in the details? Cool! Let’s break this study down then.

First, some basics on BDSM. As some readers may remember, BDSM is an acronym standing for: Bondage, Dominance/Submission, SadoMasochism… and probably a few others besides. BDSM is considered an “alternative” sexuality and is highly stigmatized here in the United States. BDSM is often misrepresented as a purely sexual practice focused on pain. In truth, it’s often more sensual than sexual or painful. Many forms of BDSM “play” involve no sex or pain at all. Specific practices vary a lot depending on the people involved**.

Within BDSM, a person is typically in one of three roles: dominant (dom/domme), submissive (sub), or switch. The terms are fairly self explanatory. Dominant “has” control, submissive “gives” control, a switch is someone who switches roles*. Sometimes being a dom/sub/switch is referred to as an orientation, sometimes it’s a role for a particular activity (“scene”)***.

What about these personality characteristics? In personality psychology, there’s the concept of the “big five” personality characteristics, OCEAN: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism. Personality characteristics are thought to be innate. You’re born with a certain personality, and it’s relatively unchangeable. Each of the “big five” can be thought of as a line, and each person falls somewhere along that line. To wit….

  • Openness: How open to new experiences are you? Open vs cautious
  • Conscientiousness: How tidy, thorough and responsible are you? Organized vs careless
  • Extraversion: How much do you enjoy being around other people? Extravert vs introvert
  • Agreeableness: How trusting and cooperative are you? Friendly vs cold
  • Neuroticism: How easily do things tip you emotionally off balance? Easily upset vs steady

Some of these traits are associated with greater happiness and resiliency (e.g., Openness, Agreeableness and Extraversion) whereas others are associated with mental instability or illness (e.g., Neuroticism). There are nuances, overlaps, and arguments over these concepts that I won’t address here, but I hope that gives you a good starting place for understanding the study results. Let me know in the comments if it doesn’t and I’ll gladly expand. This study looked at more than just the “big five”. It also included measures of rejection sensitivity, attachment style, and subjective well being.

So why look at the “big five” and all those others in the context of BDSM? The arguments of the researchers make some sense. While BDSM and the “big five” have not been directly compared before, there is some evidence that the “big five” is associated with certain sexual attitudes. The more open you are, the more permissive your attitudes around sex. The more neurotic you are, the less stable your relationships, thus impacting your sexual life. And so on. Similarly, people with secure attachment styles are more likely to have a wide variety of sexual behaviors and better trust with partner(s) than people with insecure attachment styles.

So we have our variables: the “big five”, rejection sensitivity, attachment style, subjective well-being. What about our participants?

BDSM participants were 902 Dutch people, 464 male and 438 female (no mention of trans or genderqueer folks), recruited from one Dutch BDSM forum. Control participants were 434 Dutch people screened for BDSM behavior, 129 male and 305 female, recruited from magazine ads or websites having to do with “secrets”. Men in the study were older than women. I’m really not sure this control is an adequate control for this study because of the recruitment methods… but I’m not sure it’s not either. Differences between the groups? There certainly were some other than the practice of BDSM. There were significantly more women in the control group than the BDSM group. The control group was younger and less well educated than the BDSM group, although both were more well educated than the average Dutch citizen. Whether these differences affected the study results is unknown, but a possibility.

The researchers also note a gender difference between roles in the BDSM group. Men were 33.4% submissive, 18.3% switch, and 48.3% dominant identified. Women, on the other hand, were 75.6% submissive, 16.4% switch, and 8% dominant. This is certainly reflected in the stereotypes associated with BDSM activities.

Results included:

  • People who practice BDSM were more Open, Extraverted, and Conscientious than the control participants.
  • People who practice BDSM were less Neurotic and Agreeable than the control participants
  • People who practice BDSM were less sensitive to rejection than people who didn’t practice BDSM. Within the BDSM participants, submissives were more sensitive to rejection than dominants
  • People who practice BDSM had a greater sense of well-being than control participants. Dominants scored the highest on well-being.
  • Relatively few differences between BDSM participants and control participants was found when attachment styles were examined. When there was a difference, BDSM participants had a more secure attachment than control participants.

Effect sizes were small to medium. That is about average for a psychological study.

The OCEAN results make sense within the context of BDSM. In order to even try BDSM activities, you’d need to be open to new experiences. Conscientiousness is also valued, in order to be safe. Extraversion is helpful within a community setting. The rejection sensitivity results also make sense to me – a timid person may not continue to explore BDSM after one or two rejections. But this is all after-the-fact reasoning, and not particularly predictive or scientific.

The authors note that these results contradict the long-standing assumption that women who participate in BDSM so do because they were abused as children. But they didn’t ask directly about childhood sexual abuse. Rather, they draw this conclusion from the established relationship between attachment styles and abuse history. Childhood abuse is associated with insecure attachment. But in this study, BDSM folk were more likely to have a secure attachment than the control group. I think this logic is fairly sound, though a definitive answer will need to wait for a study where childhood abuse is specifically asked about.

The most obvious limitations to this study are the participants. The BDSM and control participants were not necessarily comparable, and there were significant known differences between the groups. Those differences could have affected the study’s results. Also, as usual, this study’s results may not be generalizable to BDSM communities in other countries (e.g., the United States).

Despite the limitations, these results are a delightful breath of fresh air, when so much of the literature treats BDSM as psychopathology. People who practice BDSM has long argued that there is nothing inherently “wrong”, “sick” or “dangerous” about their sexuality. These results absolutely support their assertion. The study authors state “We therefore conclude that these results favor the view […] that BDSM may be thought of as a recreational leisure, rather than the expression of psychopathological processes.” Yes, yes and yes.

The study was published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. The abstract is publicly available.

* This is a highly simplified description. Power, and the exchange of power, is complex.

** It’s important to note, though, that for many people who participate in BDSM pain is very important, if not the central experience.

*** In addition to Dom/Sub/Switch, there’s also the idea of “topping” and “bottoming”. Topping and bottoming are much more transitory than Dom/Sub/Switch. In any particular activity, the Top is the “do-er” and the Bottom is the “do-ee”. But being Top or Bottom is activity specific and not as much of an orientation as Dom/Sub/Switch.

May 192013
 

I got back from the 2013 National Transgender Health Summit (NTHS) in Oakland last night. What a fabulous conference! I’m still processing a lot of my notes, but wanted to give a quick report on it before I flood the blog with new resources.

First some basic information. NTHS is cosponsored by UCSF’s Center of Excellence for Transgender Health and the World Professional Association for Transgender Health. It’s designed for medical professionals, mental health professionals, advocates, health administrators, students, and others. I can’t speak for previous years, but this year it was a two-day event. Sessions were broken into various tracks: research, medical, mental health, policy, and special topics. And boy, did we cover quite a lot! And, as always, I wanted to be in five different places all at once.

Aside from the official session topics, though, there were some themes that stood out to me…

  • There’s a very strong need for cross-cultural trans care. Trans care, like lots of medicine, has been focused on white people. I admit to being guilty of this too! I don’t know how being trans is handled in, for example, an urban latino/a community, and I don’t know how I can best respond to those needs as a future health care provider. I met some folks who were involved in the Trans People of Color Coalition, and I hope to not only educate myself but bring more awareness to my posts here.
  • There’s a disconnect in some areas between cultural knowledge about medical treatments in trans communities and medical knowledge. I want to give a shout out to Trystan Cotten, author of Hung Jury, for bringing attention to this within trans male communities. One of his examples? Something new for me, certainly: there are anecdotal reports that some trans men can have penetrative sex after metoidioplasty. Sounds like there needs to be a community-level conversation.
  • It sounds so far like the ICD-11 system will handle both the transgender/transsexual diagnoses and the paraphilia diagnoses much better than the previous ICDs and certainly better than the DSM system. More details when the preliminary criteria are out for comment.
  • Insurance coverages for trans-related care may improve with the Affordable Care Act. Again, more on this as information becomes more available.
  • There is a lot of research going on! Yay! I’ll try to link to some of the studies I heard about in a follow up.

Plus so much more! It was really exciting. I hope to post again with more information, links to lots of new resources and shout outs for on-going studies and organizations.