May 082014
 

CC BY 2.0) - flickr user stevendepoloA little belated, but here’s the GSM health news that came out around April this year, in no particular order…

  • There was a new meta analysis of intestinal vaginoplasties published in April. This meta analysis overall found that rate and severity of complications was “low”, with stenosis the most common complication. There were no reports of cancer. Sexual satisfaction was high, but there were no quality of life measures reported. Quality of studies were reported to be low, though, and there was a distinct lack of use of standardized measures. Source.
  • Oncology Times released a review of cancer and cancer screenings in transgender people. Highly recommend you take a look at the source.
  • A study finds that trans men on testosterone have lower levels of anxiety, depression and anger than trans men not on testosterone. Source.
  • A review of current hormonal transition effects and aging determined that, based on current data, “Older [trans people] can commence cross-sex hormone treatment without disproportionate risks.” They note that monitoring for cardiovascular health is especially important for trans women, especially those who are on progesterones. Strength or type of hormones may need to be modified in order to minimize risk. Source.
  • As much of the sex positive community has known for a long time, the BMI of cis women is (in general) not correlated with sexual activity. Source.
  • In Croatian medical students knowledge about homosexuality was correlated with positive attitudes. Source.
  • Science is awesome! The Lancet reported success in engineering vaginas for 4 women with MRKHS. No complications over the 8 years of follow up, and satisfaction with sexual functioning. Fingers crossed that this technique can be used in the future for many more women! Source.
  • Remember that sexual orientation is not the same as behavior? In a recent analysis of previously collected data, 11.2% of heterosexual-identified sexually active (presumably cisgender) women reported ever having a same-sex partner. Another way of looking at it: 1 in 10 straight women have had sex with another woman. Source.
  • Don’t forget about aftercare and cuddling! Post-sex affection appears to be correlated with relationship satisfaction. Source.
  • Unsurprising but sad: Young LGB people are more likely to binge drink alcohol when they’ve been exposed to discrimination and homophobia. Source.

 

Jun 212013
 

Image © Kristy Peet. Used under creative commons license: CC BY 2.0A third case report of a meningioma in a trans woman has just been published.

A meningioma is a tumor of the meninges, the tissues between the skull and the brain. Most meningiomas come from the arachnoid mater, through which the cerebrospinal fluid sluggishly flows. Meningiomas are mostly (90%) benign, meaning they are not cancerous and will not spread throughout the body. Current treatment is surgery to remove the tumor, with radiation available if surgery is not possible.

There is some thought that sex hormones are a factor in the growth of meningiomas. Women are more likely to develop a meningioma than men. Like some breast tumors, meningiomas have also been found to be sensitive to estrogen and/or progesterone. Sensitivity refers to the tumor cells having receptors for certain hormones, and responding to those hormones. In the case of some estrogen-sensitive breast cancers, the estrogen increases the growth of the tumor.

This case was in Australia. The patient had been on estrogen and an anti androgen (cyproterone acetate), and had had genital surgery years before. Her tumor was benign, though sensitive to progesterone and estrogen, and was surgically removed. Unusually, her tumor came back and was removed again. She underwent radiation treatment. She is reported to have chosen to stop hormones and has made a full recovery.

Whether hormone therapy influences the growth of meningiomas is unknown. So far, the data are mixed and there is no consensus in the medical community. The other two case reports continued hormone therapy with no recurrence of the tumor. To stay on the safe side, however, the authors recommend that hormone therapy be discontinued upon diagnosis of a meningioma. They also suggest that a history of meningioma may be a contraindication for starting hormone therapy.

All individuals, trans or cis, should seek medical advice if they have any neurological symptoms. This includes symptoms associated with meningiomas such as headaches, seizures, blurred vision, double vision, weakness in arms or legs, numbness, or speech problems.

This case report was published in International Journal of Transgenderism. The abstract is publicly available.

May 022013
 

 

CC BY-NC 2.0 - flickr - Jonathan Gill Summary of some of the interesting news bits from April 2013.

  • Researchers in Sweden find that early vaccinations against HPV are more effective than late vaccinations (93% effective before 14 years, 76% after 14 years and before 20 years). Abstract. Open Source Full Text.
  • Despite low risk of side effects and mild side effects, fewer U.S. parents were less likely to vaccinate against HPV in 2010 than in 2008 (43.9% unwilling to vaccinate in 2010 vs 39.8% unwilling in 2008). AbstractOpen Source Full Text.
  • Anal cancer rates have dramatically increased since 1973. Abstract.
  • Roughly 3/4ths of men who show “hypersexual” behavior report being distressed by it or having functional problems. Slightly more than half have relationship problems. Abstract.
  • Attitudes about female circumcisions have been assessed via Facebook in the “Middle East”. Female circumcision is done by doctors about half of the time, and was more common in rural areas than urban areas. Nearly half of the sample indicated that female circumcision was “necessary” or “very necessary.” Abstract.
  • Persistant genital arousal disorder may be caused by a mass, according to a recent case study.
  • In women with menstrual cycles, estrogen may have a delayed positive effect on libido. Progesterone may have a negative effect on libido. News article.
  • The U.S. Department of Justice has issued new guidelines for medical examinations after a rape. These guidelines now emphasize the survivor’s emotional and physical needs over any forensic needs. News articleGuidelines.
  • Recent cases of meningitis in gay men raised concerns that gay men may be at risk. After analysis the cases appear not to have been related. Gay men who have been sexually active in or around New York City since September 1st are still advised to get a meningitis vaccine to be on the safe side. News article.

Why the flower picture? It’s a tongue-in-cheek reference to the “flower of the month.” Besides, it’s pretty!

Did I miss anything? Let me know in the comments.

Hope you all had a lovely month!