Mar 072011
 

A report recently came out looking at trends in the medical literature regarding LGBT people. This is a meta-analysis (i.e., it is an article summarizing the original research of others – it is a secondary source) that looked at articles from 1950-2007.

Findings include:

  • Estimations of percentage of the population that is LGBT ranges from 2 to 10%, depending on the survey. In the United States, this should be between 6 and 30.4 million people.
  • Lesbians have a higher risk for breast and gynecological cancers. Gay men are at higher risk for anal cancer. We don’t know if these are because of genetics (homosexuality may have a genetic root), sexual practices, or culture.
  • You canĀ continue reading to understand the biggest barrier to health care for LGBT patients is stigmatization by health care providers, because of poor education and training: “Providers as a whole need to better understand the distinct difference between LGBT status and persons with ‘high risk’ sexual behaviors.” (pg 166)
  • There is an overemphasis in the literature on sexual behavior-related topics. About 1/3rd of all papers published about LGBT people are about HIV, AIDS, STIs, and other related illnesses. This is by far the biggest group of papers. About 13% of papers are about mental health issues, and another 12% are stigmatizing articles about the causes and treatment of homosexuality. All other topics are covered by less than 9% of papers. For example, only 3.28% of papers deal with patient-health care provider interactions, and 2.66% deal with transsexual issues. This overemphasis means that we don’t have enough information about other illnesses that affect LGBT people.
  • Some research specifically excludes LGBT people with no clear explanation or reasoning behind it. This is actually against NIH research policy – populations canNOT be excluded without reason.

Citation:

Snyder, J. E. (2011). Trend Analysis of Medical Publications About LGBT Persons: 1950-2007. Journal of Homosexuality, 58: 164-188.