Mar 202017
 

The term “gender and sexual minorities” isn’t just sexual orientation and gender identity. It also includes relationship structures, like non-monogamy, and sexual practices. Perhaps the most common minority sexual practice is BDSM/kink. BDSM stands for bondage, dominance, submission/sadism, and masochism. The terms BDSM and kink are roughly interchangeable. For today’s article I’ll be using the term kink.

Kink is an activity between consenting adults for the purpose of creating intense physical and/or psychological experiences. The intense sensations can range from physical restraint (bondage) to tickling to pain. Psychological experiences can include role playing and voluntary power exchanges. Power exchange is where one person “takes control” for a period of time. Fetishes are common. Experiences are often called “play.” There can be significant overlap between kink, polyamory, sex positivity, and LGBT communities.

As many as 2-10% of people enjoy kink. Many more have thoughts of it. Some prefer kink activities over non-kink activities. Others identify as kink-oriented or kinky. Kink-oriented people see it as part of their identity, like being gay. Still others only enjoy it from time to time. They dabble but don’t feel strongly attached.

Unfortunately, kink is heavily stigmatized in the United States. As a result kink-oriented people are afraid of “coming out”. There is also minimal understanding or acceptance of kink in the medical community. In fact, it is often confused for abuse or intimate partner violence. Patients who practice kink may not be able to get the healthcare they need.

The Kink Health Project
Rope

Rope is commonly used in kink

So what about the study? Today’s study, the Kink Health Project, was a qualitative study. The researchers came together with community members and asked open ended questions. They collected the free-form information and found themes. Aside from the demographics, no statistics here, just concepts and idea.

The study was done in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. TASHRA played a huge role. The study was designed with input from 16 community members. Then there were large “town hall” meetings, small focus groups, and interviews. So participants could keep the level of privacy they wanted. Researchers asked about experiences and thoughts about health care and kink.

In total, 115 people participated. Although they were mostly non-heterosexual (79%) and white (81%), they were also diverse in terms of age, experience in kink, and gender identity. 19% were gender non-conforming. Preferred kink role (dominant, submissive, or switch) was evenly distributed across the participants.

Despite concerns of stigma, 44 participants had visited a health care provider for a kink-related concern. 38% were “out” to their provider about practicing kink.

Themes

When researchers analyzed the data, they saw five themes emerge:

  • Physical health
  • Sociocultural aspects
  • Stigma’s impact on interactions with physicians
  • Coming out to health care providers
  • Kink-aware medical care

Physical health is perhaps the easiest aspect to grasp. Many of the practices in kink can impact health. The most common injuries in this study include bruising and related trauma, broken skin, nerve damage, fainting, burns, and needle-sticks (and other blood exposure). Despite these risks, some participants reported better physical health because of kink. They felt better about themselves. So they took better care of themselves.

As part of taking care of themselves, they wanted specific testing. Participants wanted the ability to have more frequent or complete STD or blood-bourne disease testing. They wanted testing based on their own individual risks. Not testing based on the population at large. Population risks often simply didn’t apply. It’s like pregnancy testing a lesbian who’s never had sex with a man.

Most said they got health information from their communities, not physicians. Why? Certainly they did want good health information. They especially wanted individualized medical care so they could play safely. So why get information from the community? Because they had a lot of fear of stigma from medical professionals. And because healthcare professionals don’t often know about kink, they could get better knowledge from the community. Groups like the Society of Janus exist specifically to spread knowledge.

Participants interacted with healthcare professionals differently because of the fear of stigma. They hid their activities. Some even gave false information. Others delayed appointments until bruises faded, or tried to hide marks from their play.

One area of particular concern was the fear that kink would be confused for domestic violence. Health care providers are often taught that “Bruises = abuse”. This is not always the case. Women in particular were afraid of this confusion. Delays in seeking health care were commonly reported.

Those who did come out to their health care provider, and they did have good experiences. However they were also in the San Francisco Bay Area. San Francisco is well known for being an accepting place. So participants suspected their positive experiences were probably unusual.

How can health care providers do better?
Kink Pride Flag in San Francisco

Kink Pride Flag in San Francisco

Participants in the Kink Health Project brain stormed ways that the medical profession can serve their needs better. Here are some:

  • Differentiate between domestic violence and consensual activities
  • Ask open ended questions about sexual behavior
  • Individualize screenings for sexually transmitted infections and blood-bourne infections
  • Acknowledge alternate family structures, including multiple partners
  • Provide non-judgmental counseling on decreasing risks
What can a kinky patient do?

So what can a kink-oriented patient do to potentially improve their experience in health care?

  • Consider coming out to your provider. This is an incredibly individual decision, however. Only do so if you think you’ll be safe
  • If and when you come out, give that provider resources. TASHRA is probably the best resource to start with.
  • Emphasize your desire for safety and the consensual nature of your activities. A health care provider’s first concern should be your safety. They need to know that no one is truly causing you harm.
  • If you need to, ask for a referral or seek another opinion. Not all providers are going to be comfortable treating kinky patients. It is, however, their responsibility to refer you to another provider if they’re not able to provide the care you need.

And remember: You deserve to have a health care provider who treats you with respect.

Want to read the study for yourself? The abstract is publicly available

Mar 162015
 

170px-Rod_of_Asclepius2.svgBeing a gender or sexual minority (GSM) is not only difficulty and tricky for patients — it can also be a challenge for medical providers. Medicine can be a particularly conservative field, depending on location and specialty. Lives are, after all, often at stake.

Despite recent advances it appears that some 40% of lesbian, gay and bisexual medical students are hiding their sexual minority status in medical school. Among transgender medical students, 70% were hiding their identity. All because of fear of discrimination.

That fear has been, and still is, warranted. From medical providers transitioning and losing their practices, to medical students losing their residency slots, to LGBT health student organizations fighting to exist, LGBT providers face similar discrimination as our patients.  Similar happens for other gender and sexual minority health care providers, though we lack statistics. At a meeting of kink-identified mental health care providers, one attendee noted a high level of vulnerability for the clinicians. Being “outed” could lose them their jobs or even trigger legal action.

To some extent, discretion among health care providers is warranted. Most people don’t want to know about their clinician’s (or coworker’s) personal lives. And most GSM providers don’t actually want to share those most intimate details. It’s where the line is that can be distressing — how much information is too much? Can I discuss my wife when other women clinicians are discussing their husbands? How exactly do you notify your fellow clinicians or patients about a change in gender pronouns or name? How can a clinician use information gained from intimate encounters to help patients, without revealing too much? It’s a balance we constantly seek. Sometimes mentors are there and can help. Other times we figure it out as we go along.

Yet we bring a lot to the table, as minorities. Like many racial and ethnic minorities, there are pressures and issues that affect GSM people more than the majorities. We bring that knowledge with us to the research we choose to perform, the communities we participate in, and each and every patient encounter.

We as clinicians and future clinicians need to have the support in order to be appropriately open about our gender and sexual minority status. Our patients and clients must know they can be safe and honest with us so they can receive the most complete and respectful care possible.

Some progress has been made already. There’s an association for LGBT medical professionals. There’s an association for kink psychological research. There’s an association for transgender health. All of which allow student members and provide mentoring. Many other organizations exist too. Some US medical schools are working with their students to provide a safe and welcoming environment where these issues can be explored. The American Association of Medical Colleges recently launched a program to enhance education surrounding LGBT and intersex health care. The American Medical Association also has an LGBT Advisory committee.

I’m proud to say that my medical school has been accepting and supportive of its gender and sexual minority patients, and that clinics in the area of my medical school are seeking to expand their care to be more inclusive of LGBT patients. Support exists for both those seeking medical care, and those seeking to provide that care. It’s only the beginning.

Jun 012011
 

For “older” adults, the IOM uses retirement age (around 60) as their starting age. For this group, there are no well-studied areas of health (beyond HIV/AIDS, which I don’t cover here). I’ve decided to leave the conclusion portion for another post – the last in this series.

  • Depression: Definitely more frequent in LGB elders than heterosexual elders. A very significant mental stress for this group is surviving the start of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. One study of elder gay/bisexual men found that 93% of them had known others who were HIV+ or had died of AIDS. There is no empirical data on rates of depression in elder transgender people, but it’s thought to be high.
  • Suicide/suicidal ideation: Empirical data suggest the rates of suicide are higher in LGB elders. No data on transgender elders.
  • Sexual/reproductive health: This is a rarely studied area. PCOS and its related risks may be an issue in some transgender elders. There is some indication that gay/bisexual men may be at the same risk as heterosexual men for prostate cancer. Early research implies that “lesbian bed death” may be a real phenomenon, but it’s a controversial topic. All cis-gendered women (bisexual, heterosexual, or lesbian) appear to have the same rate of hysterectomies. Sexual violence was reported on for transgender elders and it appears to be high. One study found about half of transgender elders had experienced “unwanted touch” in the past fifteen years.
  • Cancers: There are no data on cancers and transgender elders. Elder gay/bisexual men are at a higher risk of developing anal cancer (which is linked to receiving anal sex and HPV). Non-heterosexual women also appear to be at a higher risk for reproductive cancers (due to risk factors like smoking and obesity).
  • Cardiovascular health: Data appear to be conflicted. Transwomen using estrogen may be at a higher risk for venous thromboembolism (this may be because of the specific forms of estrogen used). There’s an association between transgender people getting their hormones from someone other than a doctor and poor health outcomes (e.g., osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease). The relevant transition hormones may cause long-term health problems at high doses, but no studies have really looked at this.

Risk factors include those for the younger age groups. Ageism within the LGBT communities may be an additional challenge for LGBT elders. Elders may also feel they need to hide their orientation if they move into a retirement home. Some retirement homes may also be discriminatory.  Transgender elders especially face very high threats of violence.

Some studies have found that elders felt more prepared for the aging process by being LGBT. Why? They’d already overcome huge difficulties. They’d already done a lot of personal growth. LGBT people are also more likely to have education beyond high school, and education is a well-known protective factor for the negative effects of aging. Conversely, some LGBT elders reported fewer relationship and social opportunities, being afraid of double discrimination, and problems with health care providers.

As for elder interactions with the health care system, again there’s a lot in common with younger age groups. One out of four transgender elders report being denied health care solely because they were transgender. Elders in general face problems if they need to enter assisted living homes, as some homes are discriminatory. It’s also worth noting that LGBT elder social structure is different from heterosexual social structure. LGBT elders rely much more on close friends than relatives (and/or adult children). Their chosen families are less likely to be recognized by the medical community, especially without legal paperwork.

So that’s it for what I’ll summarize from the report. Thanks for sticking around for it… this is hefty stuff.

May 262011
 

Welcome back! This part of the IOM report covers adults aged 20 to 60. There are more data available for adults than adolescents, so this part’s broken up a bit different from the last. As a reminder: GLBT (or LGBT – same meaning, different order) stands for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender. I frequently do use GLB separate from T. That is intentional, not a typo. Also, the full report is available here – you can read it online for free.

The best studied aspects of health:

  • Mood/anxiety disorders: There are conflicting data here, but the consensus so far is that GLB people have higher rates of these problems. There’s almost no research on transgender people, but one preliminary study found that around half of transgender people have depression. Yikes!
  • Suicide/Suicidal ideation: LGBT people as a whole appear to be at higher risk. Bisexuals and transgender people appear to be at an even higher risk. Risk also seems to vary by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and how far out of the closet a person is.
  • Cancer: Gay and bisexual men are definitely at a higher risk for anal cancer than heterosexual men. This risk is linked to having anal HPV, which can be spread by anal sex.

Somewhat studied:

  • Eating disorders: May be more common for GLB people than heterosexuals, but we’re not sure. No data on transgender people.
  • Sexual: Gay/bisexual men don’t appear to be at an elevated risk for erectile dysfunction. Transgender people who have had sexual reassignment surgery may be at a higher risk for sexual difficulties…not entirely surprising given the potential for nerve damage from any surgery.
  • Cancer and obesity: Lesbian/bisexual women may be at a higher risk for breast cancer than heterosexual women.
  • Hormone replacement therapy -may- affect cardiovascular health, but it’s unknown.

Essentially not studied: Reproductive health (including the effects of hormone therapy on fertility for transpeople), cancer (especially in transgender patients), and cardiovascular health

Risk factors:

  • Stigma/Discrimination/Victimization: As we all know, LGBT people face these problems all the time.  Stigma is strongly associated with psychological distress. Bisexuals have reported facing discrimination from both the straight and gay communities. One study of transgender people found that 56% had faced verbal harassment, 37% had faced employment discrimination, 19% had faced physical violence.
  • Violence: LGBT people are at an elevated risk for suffering violence. LGBT people do experience intimate partner violence, but the statistics and relative risk are unknown.
  • Substance Use: LGBT people may be more likely to use substances, especially tobacco (read my previous post on this).
  • Childhood abuse: LGB may have higher rates of childhood abuse.

Potential protective factors (LGB): supportive environments, marriage, positive LGB identity, good surgical/hormonal outcomes (T)

As for access/quality of health care? Er…it’s complicated. GLB people get less regular screening (like pap smears and basic physical exams) than heterosexuals and use the emergency room more often. Two biggest obstacles to getting good health care?: problems with the health care providers. This could be perceived discrimination (thinking that someone is acting in a discriminatory way, whether that person is or not), or simply lack of knowledge on the part of the provider. One study found only 20% of physicians had received education about LGBT health issues. That’s only  one in five! I will note that this is improving – medical schools, depending on the school and its location, are starting to teach LGBT cultural competency more than they used to.

Lack of insurance is another barrier, and it especially affects transgender people. The services they need, like hormone therapy and sexual reassignment surgery aren’t covered by insurance. In addition, one study found that a third of transgender people had been treated ill by a physician.

Next time: Older Adults and conclusions…