Nov 052013
 

News for the month of October - CC BY 2.0 - flickr user  cygnus921It’s that time of month again! No, not when we try to take over the world… it’s time for the monthly news! In no particular order, then, here we go:

  • Analysis of herbal supplements finds that many are contaminated with species not listed in the ingredients label. Herbs are typically classified as supplements in the United States, and are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration the way medications are. The FDA website has more on the regulation of herbsSource.
  • One dose of Gardasil may be enough to protect against cervical cancer (but please remember to follow your physician’s instructions about vaccines!). Source. At the same time, the HPV vaccines may be less effective for people of African heritage than for people of European heritage. Source.
  • More evidence that monthly changes in sex hormones in cisgender women are associated with changes in sex drive. Source.
  • Germany’s “indeterminate” birth certificate sex designation law comes into effect. The “Indeterminate” marker is, from what I understand, intended to denote intersex babies, not transgender people. The BBC did a fairly good summary of some community reactions. Source.
  • Low prolactin levels in cisgender men as they age has been correlated with reduced sexuality and sexual functioning. Low prolactin levels were also correlated with general unwellness. Prolactin is a hormone most well known for being involved with lactation in breast-feeding parents, but has other effects too. Source.
  • A new study examining sexual satisfaction in women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) or Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH Syndrome, aka Müllerian agenesis). Women with CAIS reported less sexual satisfaction and confidence than women with MRKH Syndrome, who mostly reported being satisfied with their sex life. The abstract on this paper is fairly scarce so I’ll try to grab a copy for better examination. Source.
  • A study in Ontario, Canada found that 1/3 of trans people needed emergency medical services in 2012, but only 71% were actually able to receive it. 1/4th of those in the survey reported avoiding the emergency room because they are trans, and just over half needed to educate their provider. Source.
  • Another study has found a decrease in psychopathology (i.e., symptoms of mental illness, such as depression or anxiety) when trans people transition. The biggest drop was just after starting hormone therapy. Source.
  • A study on the changes in sexual desire/activity in trans people was published. In a nutshell, sex drive went down for trans women with hormone therapy but recovered a bit after surgery (compared with those who wanted/planned surgery but hadn’t had it yet). In contrast, trans men generally had their sex drive go up with hormones/surgery. Source.
Jan 102011
 

The HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine Gardasil has just been approved for use in preventing anal cancer (Source). HPV is a sexually transmitted disease that causes genital warts and has been implicated in some cancers, including anal and cervical cancer. The majority of anal and cervical cancers are associated with HPV (Source).

HPV is common (around 50% of the US population has it) and difficult to control. HPV has a number of different strains. Some cause warts (including hand and genital warts), and some cause cancers (Source). It spreads by skin-to-skin contact, so any activity involving touching or licking genitals or anus can spread it. Barriers are useful in prevention, though not completely effective. As with all STIs, having few sexual partners is considered a preventative measure. Populations considered to be at high risk for HPV include men who have sex with men (presumably because of unprotected anal sex), people having anal sex, men who are not circumcised, and people with multiple partners (Source).

Gardasil is a three-shot series. It can’t grant immunity once a person’s been exposed to HPV, so it’s recommended for people who are not yet sexually active.

Anal cancer happens in both men and women, and is largely caused by HPV. Risk factors separate from the HPV-related ones include: smoking, having HIV, having a compromised immune system, and having anal sex (Source).

The FDA’s approval comes on the heels of a study showing that, in a high-risk population (men who have sex with men), Gardasil was shown to be 78% effective in preventing infection with the HPV strands that cause anal cancer (Source).

I think this is fabulous. More tools have definitely been needed in preventing HPV-related cancer. Anal cancer also seems to be something that’s rarely talked about, so I hope this will spur discussion. I certainly have further questions:

Resources and Sources:

Anal Cancer Overview

HPV Fact Sheet

FDA News Release

Wikipedia: HPV

Wikipedia: Anal cancer