Jan 182016
 

There’s been a cluster of publications and news recently that I won’t be able to dig fully into and write a full article on, but still needs mentioned. So this week’s post is a quick summary of a bunch of them!

Several articles came out pointing out that various health care professionals have a role to play in gender/sexual minority health. Articles like this are important in helping the wider medical community understand why learning about gender and sexual minority health issues is important. The articles include…

  • Obstetricians can help screen fetuses for being intersex and help to manage the medical aspect of intersex medical conditions. Gynecologists can help adult intersex people with both medical and social issues associated with being intersex. See the article.
  • Pharmacists can help with the care of trans people above and beyond just filling a prescription. They can help make sure that certain laboratory calculations are done correctly, based on the hormonal status of the patient. They can counsel on the various forms of hormones (e.g., pill vs patch vs injection). See the article.
  • Dermatologists may be able to assist in medical transition by providing hair removal and other noninvasive, aesthetic procedures. See the article.

Asking about sexual orientation and gender identity and recording it in the electronic health record is now a required part of all electronic health records by Medicare/Medicaid. This is part of “meaningful use”, and is part of the larger goal of having electronic health records that actually cooperate with each other and record the same things. Here’s a quick abstract discussing this. This is really the beginning of a change in health care around the United States — there’s now a financial incentive to screen for sexual orientation and gender identity and to handle patients who aren’t cisgender and straight. It’s good stuff.

A study of examined the effectiveness of therapy intended to change same sex sexual attraction as performed within the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Less than 4% of those surveyed experienced a change. 42% reported that it wasn’t effective, and 37% found it to be moderately to severely harmful. Those who seek to modify their sexual orientation should keep this in mind — therapy intended to change sexual orientation is far more likely to do harm than good. For context, if this therapy was a new drug the FDA would never allow it into the marketplace. It would never get past early clinical trials. In contrast, acceptance therapy (i.e., therapy meant to help one be accepting of one’s orientation) in this study was found not only to reduce depression and improve self esteem but also improved relationships with family. See the abstract.

It’s well known that lesbian, gay, and bisexual cisgender people are at higher risk of suicide than the general public. A study recently clarified some of that risk, finding that bisexual cis women are at nearly 6 times higher risk of suicide than straight cis women (roughly 4-9% of the women). Gay men were 7 times more likely to attempt than straight men (roughly 3.5-13% of gay men). Lesbian and bisexual women were also more likely to attempt suicide at a younger age than straight women — roughly 16 years old vs 19 years old. Sad news. See the abstract.

Gay and bisexual men may be more likely to rely on chosen family for social and economic support than lesbian and bisexual women and heterosexuals, who may rely more on blood relatives. See the abstract.

And very exciting — the FDA has changed their blood donation policy for men who have sex with men! Instead of an “indefinite deferral”, people who quality as “men who have had sex with men” need to wait 12 months after the last sexual encounter to donate. This brings the guidelines for sex who have sex with men roughly equivalent to the guidelines for others who are at higher risk for HIV.

If you are transgender, the guidelines are still unclear. Transgender women who had ever had sex with a man (unclear if cis or trans) used to count as “men who have sex with men” in the FDA’s eyes. Now the FDA advises that transgender people should self report their gender. What this seems to say is that trans women should be counted as women and trans men should be counted as men regardless of hormonal/surgical status. So according to the guidelines, this should be the logic…

  • If you are a cis/trans man who has had sex with another cis/trans man once since 1977, but over 12 months ago: You may donate blood.
  • If you are a cis/trans man who has had sex with another cis/trans man within the past 12 months: Wait until 12 months after that sexual encounter to donate, whether you used a condom/barrier or not.
  • If you are a cis/trans woman who has had sex with a cis/trans man in the past year, and that cis/trans man has had sex with a cis/trans man in the past year: Wait until 12 months after your sexual encounter to donate, whether you used a condom/barrier or not.
  • If you are a cis/trans woman who has not had sex with a cis/trans man in the past year: You may donate blood.
  • If you are a cis/trans woman who has had sex with a cis/trans man in the past year, but that cis/trans man has not had sex with a cis/trans man in the past year: You may donate blood.

Confusing enough? I hope that still helped. Keep in mind that all of the guidelines I attempted to simplify assumes that you’re not HIV+ (no one who is HIV+ may donate). If you’re confused still, take a look at the new guidelines or reach out to your local blood donation center.

And that’s it for this week! I hope this was fun, interesting, and helpful! Have a wonderful week.

Nov 052013
 

News for the month of October - CC BY 2.0 - flickr user  cygnus921It’s that time of month again! No, not when we try to take over the world… it’s time for the monthly news! In no particular order, then, here we go:

  • Analysis of herbal supplements finds that many are contaminated with species not listed in the ingredients label. Herbs are typically classified as supplements in the United States, and are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration the way medications are. The FDA website has more on the regulation of herbsSource.
  • One dose of Gardasil may be enough to protect against cervical cancer (but please remember to follow your physician’s instructions about vaccines!). Source. At the same time, the HPV vaccines may be less effective for people of African heritage than for people of European heritage. Source.
  • More evidence that monthly changes in sex hormones in cisgender women are associated with changes in sex drive. Source.
  • Germany’s “indeterminate” birth certificate sex designation law comes into effect. The “Indeterminate” marker is, from what I understand, intended to denote intersex babies, not transgender people. The BBC did a fairly good summary of some community reactions. Source.
  • Low prolactin levels in cisgender men as they age has been correlated with reduced sexuality and sexual functioning. Low prolactin levels were also correlated with general unwellness. Prolactin is a hormone most well known for being involved with lactation in breast-feeding parents, but has other effects too. Source.
  • A new study examining sexual satisfaction in women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) or Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH Syndrome, aka Müllerian agenesis). Women with CAIS reported less sexual satisfaction and confidence than women with MRKH Syndrome, who mostly reported being satisfied with their sex life. The abstract on this paper is fairly scarce so I’ll try to grab a copy for better examination. Source.
  • A study in Ontario, Canada found that 1/3 of trans people needed emergency medical services in 2012, but only 71% were actually able to receive it. 1/4th of those in the survey reported avoiding the emergency room because they are trans, and just over half needed to educate their provider. Source.
  • Another study has found a decrease in psychopathology (i.e., symptoms of mental illness, such as depression or anxiety) when trans people transition. The biggest drop was just after starting hormone therapy. Source.
  • A study on the changes in sexual desire/activity in trans people was published. In a nutshell, sex drive went down for trans women with hormone therapy but recovered a bit after surgery (compared with those who wanted/planned surgery but hadn’t had it yet). In contrast, trans men generally had their sex drive go up with hormones/surgery. Source.
Jul 022013
 

CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 by flickr user aling_

Time for the last month’s news. Hope you all are having fun out there. This month’s image is the theoretical flower for the month: the rose.

Gender-related news…

  • A preliminary report presented at the Endocrine Society meeting in June appears to confirm that cross-sex hormone therapy is safe in the short term (12 months). Summary.
  • Finasteride, a commonly used anti-androgen used to prevent hair loss in both cisgender men and transgender women, has now been reported to reduce alcohol consumption. Summary.
  • GnRH agonists, also called “puberty blockers”, have been shown to be safe in one study. The prime concern for years has been about bone health. Previous studies had shown a drop in bone density while on the medication. This new study confirms that bone density returns to normal after going off GnRH agonists. Summary. This study will be covered more thoroughly in a later blog post.
  • The folks at Skepchick did a wonderful piece on a recent news article on an intersex person. Check it out!

Sexuality

  • In high doses, testosterone appears to help cisgender women retain their sex drive after hysterectomy/oophorectomy. The rub? Testosterone should be given either through the skin (creams, patches, etc) or by intramuscular injection. Summary.
  • Many cisgender men are now being treated for “low testosterone levels”… when their testosterone levels were never checked. This could be very risky. Summary.
  • Exodus International has apologized to gay people and closed down. Exodus was well known for its promotion of reparative therapy for gay people. Summary.
  • The American Medical Association has come forward arguing that the ban against blood donation by men who have had sex with men (the “gay blood ban”) should be lifted. Summary. The FDA recently reviewed their policy, but decided that the ban should stay. Currently in the United States, any man (male-bodied) who has had sex with a man since 1977 is ineligible to give blood. Additionally, any woman (female-bodied) who has sex with a man who had sex with a man since 1977 is ineligible to donate for the next 12 months. The FDA’s policy on trans folk is unclear, but some trans folk report being turned away because of their gender identity.
  • A case report of “foot orgasm syndrome” was reported in the literature. A woman reported having orgasms whenever her feet were stimulated. Summary.
  • A study found that people who practice BDSM (bondage, dominance/submission, sadomasochism) are not psychologically “sick”. Summary. I’ll be covering this study in a later post. It’s interesting and need a lot of breaking down.
  • A study by Durex reports that the vast majority of people enjoy sex most when they are emotionally attached to their partner(s). Summary. Because a sex study conducted by a condom maker is totally not biased.

And the biggest item of news? The US Supreme Court declared that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act was unconstitutional. Federal and state governments are currently scrambling to figure out all the ramifications. And Proposition 8, here in California, was effectively reversed. Marriage equality now exists in my home state. Yipee!

Did I miss a piece of news? Let me know in the comments!

Feb 132011
 

A recent research article in The Journal of Sexual Medicine found that usage of a nitric oxide-delivering gel helped women with sexual response problems. The gel did not contain nitric oxide (NO) itself, but rather a molecule containing NO that quickly breaks down to release it.

NO is a gas that, among other things, causes blood vessels to dilate (widen). It is such a small molecule (just 1 nitrogen connected to 1 oxygen) that it diffuses through cells (and their membranes) quickly and easily. It’s metabolized very quickly.

NO is already well known to play a role in penile erections, so it’s not surprising it should have an effect on the physical aspects of female sexual response (NO enters the erogenous tissues and causes the blood vessels within to dilate, engorging the tissue with blood). What is different here is the specific gel used. I have hopes that similar gels will become available by prescription or commercially.

Consumer warning! Nitric oxide pills and powders are generally scams. Nitric oxide gels may contain other chemicals which may be dangerous to your health. I’ve seen at least one gel contain yohimbine extract, which should NOT be taken by anyone with heart, kidney, or liver problems. Supplements are not under the same FDA guidelines as drugs. Rule of thumb: always, ALWAYS read the ingredients list thoroughly and research the ingredients (I find NCCAM to be a good resource as well as Wikipedia.) and talk with your doctor. It’s fine to want to experiment, but please do so safely!

Another note: Nitric oxide is NOT nitrous oxide (laughing gas). Nitrous oxide is a topic for another day.

Jan 102011
 

The HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine Gardasil has just been approved for use in preventing anal cancer (Source). HPV is a sexually transmitted disease that causes genital warts and has been implicated in some cancers, including anal and cervical cancer. The majority of anal and cervical cancers are associated with HPV (Source).

HPV is common (around 50% of the US population has it) and difficult to control. HPV has a number of different strains. Some cause warts (including hand and genital warts), and some cause cancers (Source). It spreads by skin-to-skin contact, so any activity involving touching or licking genitals or anus can spread it. Barriers are useful in prevention, though not completely effective. As with all STIs, having few sexual partners is considered a preventative measure. Populations considered to be at high risk for HPV include men who have sex with men (presumably because of unprotected anal sex), people having anal sex, men who are not circumcised, and people with multiple partners (Source).

Gardasil is a three-shot series. It can’t grant immunity once a person’s been exposed to HPV, so it’s recommended for people who are not yet sexually active.

Anal cancer happens in both men and women, and is largely caused by HPV. Risk factors separate from the HPV-related ones include: smoking, having HIV, having a compromised immune system, and having anal sex (Source).

The FDA’s approval comes on the heels of a study showing that, in a high-risk population (men who have sex with men), Gardasil was shown to be 78% effective in preventing infection with the HPV strands that cause anal cancer (Source).

I think this is fabulous. More tools have definitely been needed in preventing HPV-related cancer. Anal cancer also seems to be something that’s rarely talked about, so I hope this will spur discussion. I certainly have further questions:

Resources and Sources:

Anal Cancer Overview

HPV Fact Sheet

FDA News Release

Wikipedia: HPV

Wikipedia: Anal cancer