Jun 032014
 

6763959_10420a4b6a_mThe biggest news for May of 2014 is really that Medicare lifted the blanket ban on covering genital surgeries for trans people. The National Center for Transgender Equality has a good summary (PDF) of what the decision actually means. If you’re trans and interested in surgery and are a Medicare recipient, I recommend calling the physician who’s prescribing your hormones and consulting with them about next steps. The news was covered in multiple outlets including the NY Times and CNN.

The other piece of news I spotted that is not getting as much traction as I’d like is this: Urine is NOT sterile! For a long time it’s been believed that urine produced by healthy people is sterile – at least until it passes through the urethra. Turns out not to be the case. Something to keep in mind if you have contact with urine. Source

Interested in the other news? Read on!

  • Work continues on the possibility of three-parent babies. While much of the research and reporting talks about preventing mitochondrial diseases, I still think it opens a wonderful door for three-parent poly households. The latest news is fairly political, but supportive.
  • Another study out of Europe indicates that transgender hormone therapy is safe. This was a 1-year study of both men and women, just over 100 people total No deaths or serious adverse reactions were reported. Highly recommend you skim the abstract for yourself! For US readers, please do note though that the hormones used in the study were different formulations than those used in the US. Source.
  • A published case study reminds us that not all “odd” physical things during medical transition are related to transition. This was a case of a trans man who had undiagnosed acromegaly from a benign brain tumor. Eek! He was correctly diagnosed and treated, thankfully. Source.
  • A Swedish review of transgender-related records found a transition regret rate of 2.2%. Other prevalence data, including the usual male:female ratios, are included. Source.
  • A study of gay men found that they have worse outcomes from prostate cancer treatments than straight men. Source.
Apr 162014
 

One of the premier medical journals, the New England Journal of Medicine, regularly has perspective/opinion pieces. For a pre-med like me, they can be some of the most valuable pages in the journal — they can be windows into medical practice, public policy and the study and practice of medicine. I read them regularly, since my wife got me a subscription to NEJM. Most aren’t related to gender and sexual minority health, so I haven’t addressed them here much. But in the April 10th edition of NEJM, a treasure! Gilbert Gonzales did a good summary of the intersection between same-sex marriage and health.

Many health journals, including NEJM, tend to live behind a pay wall. This particular article, thankfully, is not. But in the interests of public knowledge and discourse, I wanted to summarize some of the interesting points in this article. A heads up: this is a distinctly United States-focused article.

  • Despite recent advances, roughly 60% of the US population lives in a state that prohibits same-sex marriage
  • There are significant health disparities between LGBT and heterosexual/cisgender people, as shown by the 2011 Institute of Medicine report on LGBT health (which I summarized in 3 parts at the time).
  • Discriminatory environments lead to poorer health outcomes. Example: LGBT people in states that ban same-sex marriage have higher rates of depression, anxiety, and alcohol use than straight/cis people in the same states. By the same token, states where same-sex marriage (e.g., MA and CA) was legalized show a drop in mental health care visits for some GLBT people (e.g., gay men).
  • Legalizing same-sex marriage improves access to health insurance for both same-sex spouses and children of same-sex parents.
  • The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from denying health insurance coverage because of sexual orientation, transgender identity, or pre-existing conditions like HIV.
  • The recent decision on DOMA (United States v Windsor) means couples in a same-sex marriage get taxed like other married couples. This lowers the tax burden of health care costs and health insurance.
  • Health benefits of same-sex marriage should be included in discussion of marriage equality.

All good things to point out, and good to see in such a mainstream medical journal.

We’re lucky enough that the NEJM has decided to have this article be open access. So if you can, read it to form your own opinions!

And as always…  Stay healthy, stay safe, and have fun!

Jul 022013
 

CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 by flickr user aling_

Time for the last month’s news. Hope you all are having fun out there. This month’s image is the theoretical flower for the month: the rose.

Gender-related news…

  • A preliminary report presented at the Endocrine Society meeting in June appears to confirm that cross-sex hormone therapy is safe in the short term (12 months). Summary.
  • Finasteride, a commonly used anti-androgen used to prevent hair loss in both cisgender men and transgender women, has now been reported to reduce alcohol consumption. Summary.
  • GnRH agonists, also called “puberty blockers”, have been shown to be safe in one study. The prime concern for years has been about bone health. Previous studies had shown a drop in bone density while on the medication. This new study confirms that bone density returns to normal after going off GnRH agonists. Summary. This study will be covered more thoroughly in a later blog post.
  • The folks at Skepchick did a wonderful piece on a recent news article on an intersex person. Check it out!

Sexuality

  • In high doses, testosterone appears to help cisgender women retain their sex drive after hysterectomy/oophorectomy. The rub? Testosterone should be given either through the skin (creams, patches, etc) or by intramuscular injection. Summary.
  • Many cisgender men are now being treated for “low testosterone levels”… when their testosterone levels were never checked. This could be very risky. Summary.
  • Exodus International has apologized to gay people and closed down. Exodus was well known for its promotion of reparative therapy for gay people. Summary.
  • The American Medical Association has come forward arguing that the ban against blood donation by men who have had sex with men (the “gay blood ban”) should be lifted. Summary. The FDA recently reviewed their policy, but decided that the ban should stay. Currently in the United States, any man (male-bodied) who has had sex with a man since 1977 is ineligible to give blood. Additionally, any woman (female-bodied) who has sex with a man who had sex with a man since 1977 is ineligible to donate for the next 12 months. The FDA’s policy on trans folk is unclear, but some trans folk report being turned away because of their gender identity.
  • A case report of “foot orgasm syndrome” was reported in the literature. A woman reported having orgasms whenever her feet were stimulated. Summary.
  • A study found that people who practice BDSM (bondage, dominance/submission, sadomasochism) are not psychologically “sick”. Summary. I’ll be covering this study in a later post. It’s interesting and need a lot of breaking down.
  • A study by Durex reports that the vast majority of people enjoy sex most when they are emotionally attached to their partner(s). Summary. Because a sex study conducted by a condom maker is totally not biased.

And the biggest item of news? The US Supreme Court declared that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act was unconstitutional. Federal and state governments are currently scrambling to figure out all the ramifications. And Proposition 8, here in California, was effectively reversed. Marriage equality now exists in my home state. Yipee!

Did I miss a piece of news? Let me know in the comments!