Oct 172016
 
Barriers are not always as obvious as a wall

Barriers are not always as obvious as a wall

Although many want to, not all transgender people are able to medically transition. The transgender community has been vocal about their needs and the barriers to medical care. However we still need research literature on the topic. Some research has been done, but not enough. Today’s study looked closer at who is receiving medical transition treatment and who hasn’t, and why they haven’t been able to get treatment.

As a quick reminder, medical transition is the medical treatment transgender people receive to treat gender dysphoria. Medical transition physically changes a person’s body from looking like one sex to looking like another. It usually includes hormone therapy and surgery. For more information, I recommend reading Trans 101 for Trans People.

Back to our study! Sineath et al polled transgender people who attended the Southern Comfort Conference (SCC). SCC is a yearly conference dedicated to education and networking in the transgender community. Of the 453 participants who stared answering the survey, 280 completed it. Participants answered demographic questions. They also answered questions about the medical therapy they had received and wanted to receive. There was a free writing section where participants could detail why they had not received any treatments they wanted.

That’s rather striking change between those who started the survey and those who finished it. And unfortunately there were differences between the group who finished it and the group who did not. Those who finished it were more likely to be college educated and trans women. That means that trans men and less well educated people were under represented in this study. While I don’t think there was much that Sineath et al could have done to prevent it, this does mean that the results should be taken with a grain of salt.

What did Sineath et al find?

Of the 280 participants who completed the survey, the majority (84%) were trans women. The rest (16%) were trans men. In this sample, trans women were more likely to be white, in a relationship, and over the age of 40 than trans men.

59% of participants had used, or were currently taking, hormone therapy. Roughly equal percentages of trans men (63%) and trans women (58%) had ever had hormone therapy. Among those who had never had hormone therapy, 53% of trans women and 76% of trans men planned to have it.

Trans men were far more likely to have gotten chest surgery (26%) or want it (88%) than trans women (5% and 40%, respectively). Of all 280 participants, only 11 (3.9%) had received genital surgery. All 11 were trans women. Roughly equal proportions of trans men and trans women wanted genital surgery.

Interestingly, nonwhite and single participants were more likely to have received hormone therapy than white and partnered participants.

I confess, I would have thought that the white people would have had more hormone therapy than non-white people. White people tend to have more resources. Perhaps there are also more barriers though? There are resources specifically aimed at non-white trans people, and perhaps they’re being especially effective. I am not entirely certain what to make of this. If you have ideas, let me know in the comments!

As for single trans people being more likely to have hormone therapy than partnered, that is more immediately understandable. Married or partnered trans people may be negotiating their transition with their partner. Or they may be waiting for children to grow. Either way, a delay makes sense.

What barriers were keeping people from getting medical transition?

There was also a significant difference in why participants had not received medical care between trans men and trans women. For trans men, lack of qualified care was the most dominant factor. 41% of trans men in this study cited that reason. Another 29% cited cost. A scattering of others cited fear of surgery (6%), employment issues (6%), and “other” (18%).

Trans women had a different distribution of concerns. Cost was the most commonly cited reason for not getting medical transition (23%). Employment issues was second largest, at 19%. Others cited age (9%), readiness (9%), needing a psychiatrist letter (7%), not feeling like they needed surgery (6%), fear of surgery (4%), and inability to access qualified care (2%). 21% cited “other” reasons.

What does all this mean?

This study found that 59% of trans participants use hormone therapy. That’s much lower than other studies. According to Sineath et al, previous studies found rates anywhere from 70% to 93%. Why the discrepancy? Studies with high levels of hormone therapy usually were conducted at clinics. Clinics are where participants actively seek hormone therapy! That explains why 93% of trans people in some studies were on hormone therapy. But why the 70%? That number came from a one-time survey that wasn’t clinic specific. It’s difficult to say how many trans people actually do get hormone therapy across the entire US. The real number may be somewhere between 59% and 70%.

 

This study also found pretty significant differences in the barriers trans people reported. Trans men cited the lack of access to qualified care far more than trans women did. That makes sense. Trans women are far more represented in both popular and medical media. The medical care of trans women is often talked about. I see far more papers and case reports about trans women in the medical literature. More surgeons offer vaginoplasties than metoidioplasties or phalloplasties.

Trans women experienced issues with employment more than trans men. Again, this makes sense. Trans women typically have a harder time “passing” than trans men. Women are subject to employment difficulties and interpersonal violence more because they’re more visible.

I, personally, look at how many trans men are struggling finding qualified care. I’m listening most strongly to that. So much of the talk around transgender care is about trans women. It really is past time that trans men get as much, or more, focus.

Conclusion

Ultimately, this study is a solid contribution to our understanding of medical transition. Thank you to Sineath et al and all the participants at the Southern Comfort Conference!

Want to read the article for yourself? The abstract is publicly available.

Citation: Sineath, R. C., Woodyatt, C., Sanchez, T., Giammattei, S., Gillespie, T., Hunkeler, E., … & Sullivan, P. S. (2016). Determinants of and Barriers to Hormonal and Surgical Treatment Receipt Among Transgender People.Transgender Health, 1(1), 129-136.