Jun 152015
 

Mortier_PillonTestosterone replacement therapy has become nearly common place recently. Marketing of testosterone creams is everywhere. In addition to the big pharmaceutical companies, compounding pharmacies are now making and selling testosterone creams too. Compounding pharmacies are typically small local pharmacies where the medications are made and mixed on site. A compounded medication can be helpful to someone who, for example, is allergic to a filler used in a commercial product. Compounded products are often cheaper than commercial non-generic products. Compounded products are supposed to be standardized just like commercial products are. But are they?

The Federal Food and Drug Administration (United States) produced a report back in 2006 that showed that somewhere around 33% of compounding pharmacies were not making or selling standardized products.

Now a Canadian study confirms that compounding pharmacies may not be well standardized either. The researches took samples at two different times from ten randomly selected compounding pharmacies in Toronto. The samples were then analyzed and compared to two different commercial forms.

The commercial forms were consistently within 20% of the prescribed dose. Only 50% of the compounded forms in the first batch were within those limits. Worse, only 30%  of the second compounded batch were within that limit. Yikes! One pharmacy even had no testosterone in its product at all. The consistency within a pharmacy’s products also varied wildly. One pharmacy had 91% of the of the testosterone it was supposed to have in one sample, and only 8% in another sample.

The compounded testosterone was generally cheaper than the commercial testosterone. Compounded testosterone ranged from $57-161 for a 30-day supply, averaging around $105. The commercial stuff was $140-150 for 30-days.

This has very serious concerns for patients. Wild swings in testosterone level are not safe. For their safety and health, a patient should receive the dose that was prescribed. Not “half the dose one month” and “double the dose the next”. The lower price of the compounded products could easily lure a lower income patient into purchasing the compound instead of the commercial.

What can you do as a patient? Make sure that you get your prescriptions from a non-compounding pharmacy. If cost is an issue, talk with your pharmacist about using a generic. Generics are held to the same standards are brand-name drugs and are often made by the same company. Alternatively, consider discussing medication options with your physician and/or pharmacist.

Want to read the study for yourself? The abstract is publicly available!

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