Mar 162015
 

170px-Rod_of_Asclepius2.svgBeing a gender or sexual minority (GSM) is not only difficulty and tricky for patients — it can also be a challenge for medical providers. Medicine can be a particularly conservative field, depending on location and specialty. Lives are, after all, often at stake.

Despite recent advances it appears that some 40% of lesbian, gay and bisexual medical students are hiding their sexual minority status in medical school. Among transgender medical students, 70% were hiding their identity. All because of fear of discrimination.

That fear has been, and still is, warranted. From medical providers transitioning and losing their practices, to medical students losing their residency slots, to LGBT health student organizations fighting to exist, LGBT providers face similar discrimination as our patients.  Similar happens for other gender and sexual minority health care providers, though we lack statistics. At a meeting of kink-identified mental health care providers, one attendee noted a high level of vulnerability for the clinicians. Being “outed” could lose them their jobs or even trigger legal action.

To some extent, discretion among health care providers is warranted. Most people don’t want to know about their clinician’s (or coworker’s) personal lives. And most GSM providers don’t actually want to share those most intimate details. It’s where the line is that can be distressing — how much information is too much? Can I discuss my wife when other women clinicians are discussing their husbands? How exactly do you notify your fellow clinicians or patients about a change in gender pronouns or name? How can a clinician use information gained from intimate encounters to help patients, without revealing too much? It’s a balance we constantly seek. Sometimes mentors are there and can help. Other times we figure it out as we go along.

Yet we bring a lot to the table, as minorities. Like many racial and ethnic minorities, there are pressures and issues that affect GSM people more than the majorities. We bring that knowledge with us to the research we choose to perform, the communities we participate in, and each and every patient encounter.

We as clinicians and future clinicians need to have the support in order to be appropriately open about our gender and sexual minority status. Our patients and clients must know they can be safe and honest with us so they can receive the most complete and respectful care possible.

Some progress has been made already. There’s an association for LGBT medical professionals. There’s an association for kink psychological research. There’s an association for transgender health. All of which allow student members and provide mentoring. Many other organizations exist too. Some US medical schools are working with their students to provide a safe and welcoming environment where these issues can be explored. The American Association of Medical Colleges recently launched a program to enhance education surrounding LGBT and intersex health care. The American Medical Association also has an LGBT Advisory committee.

I’m proud to say that my medical school has been accepting and supportive of its gender and sexual minority patients, and that clinics in the area of my medical school are seeking to expand their care to be more inclusive of LGBT patients. Support exists for both those seeking medical care, and those seeking to provide that care. It’s only the beginning.

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