May 192013
 

I got back from the 2013 National Transgender Health Summit (NTHS) in Oakland last night. What a fabulous conference! I’m still processing a lot of my notes, but wanted to give a quick report on it before I flood the blog with new resources.

First some basic information. NTHS is cosponsored by UCSF’s Center of Excellence for Transgender Health and the World Professional Association for Transgender Health. It’s designed for medical professionals, mental health professionals, advocates, health administrators, students, and others. I can’t speak for previous years, but this year it was a two-day event. Sessions were broken into various tracks: research, medical, mental health, policy, and special topics. And boy, did we cover quite a lot! And, as always, I wanted to be in five different places all at once.

Aside from the official session topics, though, there were some themes that stood out to me…

  • There’s a very strong need for cross-cultural trans care. Trans care, like lots of medicine, has been focused on white people. I admit to being guilty of this too! I don’t know how being trans is handled in, for example, an urban latino/a community, and I don’t know how I can best respond to those needs as a future health care provider. I met some folks who were involved in the Trans People of Color Coalition, and I hope to not only educate myself but bring more awareness to my posts here.
  • There’s a disconnect in some areas between cultural knowledge about medical treatments in trans communities and medical knowledge. I want to give a shout out to Trystan Cotten, author of Hung Jury, for bringing attention to this within trans male communities. One of his examples? Something new for me, certainly: there are anecdotal reports that some trans men can have penetrative sex after metoidioplasty. Sounds like there needs to be a community-level conversation.
  • It sounds so far like the ICD-11 system will handle both the transgender/transsexual diagnoses and the paraphilia diagnoses much better than the previous ICDs and certainly better than the DSM system. More details when the preliminary criteria are out for comment.
  • Insurance coverages for trans-related care may improve with the Affordable Care Act. Again, more on this as information becomes more available.
  • There is a lot of research going on! Yay! I’ll try to link to some of the studies I heard about in a follow up.

Plus so much more! It was really exciting. I hope to post again with more information, links to lots of new resources and shout outs for on-going studies and organizations.

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