Mar 072011
 

A report recently came out looking at trends in the medical literature regarding LGBT people. This is a meta-analysis (i.e., it is an article summarizing the original research of others – it is a secondary source) that looked at articles from 1950-2007.

Findings include:

  • Estimations of percentage of the population that is LGBT ranges from 2 to 10%, depending on the survey. In the United States, this should be between 6 and 30.4 million people.
  • Lesbians have a higher risk for breast and gynecological cancers. Gay men are at higher risk for anal cancer. We don’t know if these are because of genetics (homosexuality may have a genetic root), sexual practices, or culture.
  • You can continue reading to understand the biggest barrier to health care for LGBT patients is stigmatization by health care providers, because of poor education and training: “Providers as a whole need to better understand the distinct difference between LGBT status and persons with ‘high risk’ sexual behaviors.” (pg 166)
  • There is an overemphasis in the literature on sexual behavior-related topics. About 1/3rd of all papers published about LGBT people are about HIV, AIDS, STIs, and other related illnesses. This is by far the biggest group of papers. About 13% of papers are about mental health issues, and another 12% are stigmatizing articles about the causes and treatment of homosexuality. All other topics are covered by less than 9% of papers. For example, only 3.28% of papers deal with patient-health care provider interactions, and 2.66% deal with transsexual issues. This overemphasis means that we don’t have enough information about other illnesses that affect LGBT people.
  • Some research specifically excludes LGBT people with no clear explanation or reasoning behind it. This is actually against NIH research policy – populations canNOT be excluded without reason.

Citation:

Snyder, J. E. (2011). Trend Analysis of Medical Publications About LGBT Persons: 1950-2007. Journal of Homosexuality, 58: 164-188.

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  2 Responses to “Trend Analysis of Medical Publications About LGBT Persons: 1950-2007”

  1. Just to make sure I’m clear that “transsexual issues” means trans-specific medical care as I’m too used to having studies break things down based on specific topics and then “anything that includes a trans person anywhere.”

    • This article defined that category as “transsexualism, sex-change surgery, and hormonal treatment for transsexuals”. I would assume that other trans issues fall under the other appropriate categories (e.g., coming out as trans should be under the coming out category). The author doesn’t specify that, though. What’s your interpretation, since I know you’ve got the original article?

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