Jun 272016
 

Welcome back to Open Minded Health Promotion! This week is all about how cisgender women who have sex with women, including lesbian and bisexual women, can maximize their health. As a reminder — these are all in addition to health promotion activities that apply to most people, like colon cancer screening at age 50.

Woman-and-woman-icon.svgAll cisgender women who have sex with women should consider…

  • Talk with their physician about their physical and mental health
  • Practice safer sex where possible to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Some sexually transmitted infections can be passed between women. If sexual toys are shared, consider using barriers or cleaning them between uses.
  • If under the age of 26, get the HPV vaccine. This will reduce the chance for cervical, vaginal, anal, and oral cancers.
  • Avoid tobacco, limit alcohol, and limit/avoid other drugs. If you choose to use substances and are unwilling to stop, consider using them in the safest ways possible. For example, consider vaporizing marijuana instead of smoking, or participate in a clean needle program.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Women who have sex with women are more likely to be overweight than their heterosexual peers. Being overweight is associated with heart disease and a lower quality of life.
  • Exercise regularly. Weight bearing exercise, like walking and running, is best for bone health. But anything that gets your heart rate up and gets you moving is good for your body and mind!
  • Seek help if you’re struggling with self injury, anorexia, or bulimia. These issues are much more common in women than in men, and can be particularly challenging to deal with.
  • Consider taking folic acid supplements if pregnancy is a possibility. Folic acid prevents some birth defects.
  • Discuss their family’s cancer history with their physician.

Your physician may wish to do other tests, including…

  • Cervical cancer screening/Pap smear. All women with a cervix, starting at age 21, should get a pap smear every 3-5 years at minimum. Human papilloma virus (HPV) testing may also be included. More frequent pap smears may be recommended if one comes back positive or abnormal.
  • Pregnancy testing, even if you have not had contact with semen. Emergency situations are where testing is most likely to be urged. Physicians are, to some extent, trained to assume a cisgender woman is pregnant until proven otherwise. If you feel strongly that you do not want to get tested, please discuss this with your physician.
  • BRCA screening to determine your breast cancer risk, if breast cancer runs in your family. They may wish to perform other genetic testing as well, and may refer you to a geneticist.
  • If you’re between the ages of 50 and 74, mammography every other year is recommended. Mammography is a screening test for breast cancer. Breast self exams are no longer recommended.

One note on sexually transmitted infections… some lesbian and bisexual women may feel that they are not at risk for sexually transmitted infections because they don’t have contact with men. This is simply not true. The specific STIs are different, but there are still serious infections that can be spread from cis woman to cis woman. Infections that cis lesbians and bisexual women are at risk for include: chlamydia, herpes, HPV, pubic lice, trichomoniasis, and bacterial vaginosis (Source). Other infections such as gonorrhea, HIV, and syphilis are less likely but could still be spread. Please play safe and seek treatment if you are exposed or having symptoms.

Want more information? You can read more from the CDC, Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, and the United States Preventative Services Task Force.

Jun 132016
 

The recent shooting in Pulse, a gay nightclub, in Orlando is horrific. I struggle to find words. This was a senseless act of hatred.

Black Ribbon - a symbol of mourn

Black Ribbon – a symbol of mourn

Support comes in many forms. If you’re local, the Orlando LGBT Center has information on how you can help, including a GoFundMe donation page. If you can give blood, money, or time — then please do so. As John Scalzi so eloquently put it, “In the aftermath of terrible violence, offer thoughts, and prayers, if it is your desire to do so. Then offer more than thoughts and prayers.”

Take care of yourself too. If you need, there is an LGBT Hotline available. Call a friend, visit your local community center, see a counselor, or go for a long run. Do what you need to do.

But please, don’t turn this tragedy into an anti-Muslim cry. This was not an attack organized by an entire religion. This was an attack by one individual. We must all stand together in love and against hate. I highly recommend reading this press release and this article, if you want to know more.

This is not the first time that gender and sexual minority communities have been attacked. This is not the first time that an act of hate is being used to attack another minority group. It will likely not be the last.

We mourn. We weep. We give. We change, and we act to prevent. And we will dance. Because to not dance is to let the hatred and fear kill the joy of life. And that would be the ultimate loss.

Stand together in love, friends.

Apr 252016
 

For many reasons, transgender women as a group are at high risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The types of STIs a trans woman is at risk for changes after vaginoplasty but doesn’t go away. Reports of (neo) vaginal infection by gonorrhea and chlamydia are rare, for example. Trans women with (neo) vaginas may be at higher risk for HIV because of the greater possibility of a vaginal tear. Relatively little is known about the risk for other STIs, such as the human papilloma virus (HPV). Today I take a look at a new paper on HPV infection in post-vaginoplasty trans women.

HPV, the Human Papilloma Virus

HPV, the Human Papilloma Virus

HPV is a virus spread by skin-to-skin contact. There are different types of the virus. Some types cause warts (NSFW link). All warts are caused by a version of HPV. Warts that are on the genitals or anus are caused by specific types of HPV that are considered sexually-transmitted infections (types 6 and 11). The warts can be uncomfortable or painful. They can be very small or grow to become large masses. Warts themselves are fairly harmless otherwise.

The types of HPV that don’t cause warts are more dangerous. Those include types 16, 18, 31, and 33. These types don’t cause warts, but they cause changes that can lead to cancer. Cancers that have been associated with infection include cervical cancer, vaginal cancer, anal cancer, penile cancer, and some throat/oropharyngeal cancers. As you can tell from where these cancers happen, these types of HPV are often sexually transmitted. Screening tests for associated cancers include cervical pap smear, anal pap smear, and testing for the virus.

HPV can be prevented by vaccine and by barriers such as condoms and dental dams. Most vaccines prevent both the cancer-causing and genital wart-causing types. There is no cure for infection. Treatment is limited to removal of warts and treatment for cancers.

What about HPV infection in post-vaginoplasty trans women? Since HPV is a skin-to-skin contact infection, the (neo) vagina can still be infected by HPV. What has been reported in the medical literature about HPV infection? This paper presented 4 cases of vaginal HPV in their clinic and summarized 9 reports that had previously been reported in the medical literature. So they discussed 13 reports of HPV total.

They only reported symptomatic HPV cases. So only women who were having pain, discomfort, or other symptoms from an infection were discussed.

Most of the women had had a penile inversion vaginoplasty. One woman had a sigmoid vaginoplasty, one had a “split skin graft” (NSFW) vaginoplasty, and one was unknown. Split skin graft is a technique that uses skin from elsewhere on the body, and is sometimes used for cis women who were born without a vagina.

Of the four new cases discussed in the article, all came to the clinic with pain, either vaginal or vulvar. Three of the four women had genital warts, which were removed. The fourth had a white discoloration (“leukoplakia”), also caused by human papilloma virus. The pain and symptoms of all four were resolved with treatment and the lesions did not come back. All four were HIV negative and had previously had penis-in-vagina sex with at least one cis man.

There was less reported about the 9 cases that had previously been reported in the medical literature. 7 out of the 9 had genital warts. 6 of those 7 had the warts successfully removed. The 7th had to have a vaginectomy to remove the warts. Of the two who did not have warts, one had vaginal cancer and had to have a vaginectomy and chemo. The last had a pre-cancerous lesion, and we don’t know what happened to her.

The types of treatment for warts varied. Some were removed successfully with medication. Others were removed surgically. Still others were removed with laser or electricity.

Ultimately — all these results sound like what happens with cis women. Warts happen, cause pain or distress, and are treated. Less commonly, HPV causes cancer or pre-cancerous lesions and that is treated.

What this article brings to attention is that trans women need HPV prevention as much as everyone else. HPV vaccination for people up to age 26 is recommended. For those older than 26, barriers during sex with partners is a useful tool.

UCSF recommends “periodic” visual examination of the (neo) vagina to look for changes that may be pre-cancerous lesions. But they don’t define what “periodic” means. Cis women get pap smears every 3-5 years; 3-5 years may be a reasonable range for trans women too, but we just don’t know for sure. So if you’re concerned, talk with your physician about screening.

Want to know more about HPV? The CDC has good information.

Want to read the study for yourself? The abstract is publicly available.

Apr 112016
 

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a major cause of illness. It particularly effects men who have sex with men (MSM) and trans women. Most studies of HIV and HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) lump MSM and trans women into one group. As if gay men, bisexual men, and trans women all have similar risk factors. In fact — they don’t. They are very, very different groups.

Truvada, the only FDA-approved PrEP preparation

Truvada is the only FDA-approved PrEP preparation right now

For most of the history of HIV, barrier methods and abstinence have been the only ways to prevent the spread of HIV. Today we have treatment-as-prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Treatment-as-prevention involves treating people affected with HIV with HIV-suppressing medications. By reducing the number of viruses a person is carrying around with them, the chances that any one virus can infect another person go down.

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been available since 2012. It involves taking an HIV-suppressing drug every day. That way, if an HIV virus actually comes into contact with that person the virus won’t be able to infect them. Only one medication is currently approved for use in the United States, and that is Truvada. PrEP prevents HIV infection when taken every day at the same time. All HIV infections that have happened to date while a person was on PrEP occurred because the person took PrEP inconsistently.

This week we look at a study exploring the use of PrEP and HIV risks among trans women specifically. To my knowledge no study until this one has separated out MSM and trans women.

This is important! Not only are trans women at high risk for being infected with HIV…but there have been few HIV prevention guidelines and interventions directly targeting trans women. Both the WHO and CDC HIV PrEP guidelines do not include trans women.

This paper examined data from the iPrEx study, which was a study of the use of PrEP among people assigned male at birth in the US, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, South Africa, and Thailand. This paper in particular examined differences between trans women and MSM in the iPrEx trial.

What kinds of things did they find?

First — 15% of the participants in the trial were trans woman. They either identified explicitly as trans, or identified as a woman when asked. Compared with MSM participants, trans women were more likely to…

  • less education
  • have more sexual partners and have a history of sex work (64% vs 38% of MSM)
  • more likely to live alone (23% vs 14%)
  • less likely to use a condom for receptive anal sex (14% trans women used a condom vs 45% of MSM)
  • were more likely to use cocaine or methamphetamine (11% vs 7% of MSM)

Not the most heartening information, but also not brand new. It’s been known for a while that trans women do participate in sex work out of lack of options. Higher numbers of sexual partners, lower levels of condom usage, sex work, and substance use are all associated with HIV infection.

What about PrEP and HIV though? Trans women not on hormone therapy and MSM had similar levels of PrEP in their blood. That means they were taking the medications regularly and the medication was doing what it’s supposed to. And this wasn’t because of a hormone effect. The researchers did ask the participants how often they were taking their PrEP. Trans women on hormones were less likely to report always using PREP.

All the trans women who did become infected with HIV during this trial were taking PrEP at the time. In contrast, all the trans women who took PrEP regularly did not become infected with HIV.

It’s also good to note that there were no adverse drug effects noted in this trial. The PrEP medications did not cause significant harm. There were some changes to liver function tests and kidney tests. However those changes didn’t cause medically noticeable harm.

So what are the take-aways here?

  1. PrEP in trans women works when taken daily.
  2. There are significant differences between trans women and MSM. They should not be lumped together in one group.
  3. Further research on potential interactions between PrEP and hormone therapy should be done. This is just to be safe — we want to make sure that PrEP doesn’t effect hormone therapy and that hormone therapy doesn’t effect PrEP

Lastly — if you or your partner(s) are at risk for HIV infection, talk with your doctor about whether PrEP is right for you. It’s a great option in the fight to prevent HIV infection.

Want to read the study for yourself? The abstract is publicly available